Homeschooling in Maine

Educational Outreach: Why Homeschooling Works

  Home    Getting Started    How To Homeschool    How Do I Teach...    Beyond the Basics    Support  
  Why Homeschool?    Where to Begin    Legal/Homeschool Laws    History of Homeschooling    
 


Community Outreach: Talking About Homeschooling
Can Your Children Explain Why They Homeschool?
Zan Tyler
Every child is asked a thousand questions in his growing-up years. If that child happens to be homeschooled the tally rises to a million fairly quickly! You know how it is--you can't go through the check-out line in the grocery store without you and your children being riddled with questions. Homeschooled children are questioned by friends, by relatives, by people at church, by strangers, and occasionally by a TV reporter or a legislator. And sometimes well-meaning friends and relatives can't wait to get your children alone so they can find out what they really think and feel. You will be doing your children and yourself a great service if you teach them how to handle questions in a graceful, confident, knowledgeable way.
Homeschooling Advocacy Step by Step
VaHomeschoolers
Advocacy is for everyone. Any concerned parent can become an advocate for homeschooling freedoms. And so can you. This series of five articles will walk you through the steps you can take to become an effective advocate for homeschooling in your community.
Marketing to Homeschoolers with Podcasts
Kimmie Lanley
With podcasts you have a chance to reach a new component of the homeschool audience that you might not reach via newsletters, blog posts, or social media. This video details three advantages to marketing through podcasts.
Marketing to Homeschoolers with Social Media
Jimmie Lanley
How homeschoolers interact with social media. Myths about using social media for marketing to the homeschool audience. Social media preferences for the homeschool market.
The Homeschooling Image: Public Relations Basics
Mary Griffith
This free e-book download contains Mary Griffith's work addressing issues concerning the image of homeschoolers as presented by individual homeschoolers and homeschool organizations. It is written for support group leaders and activists in the homeschooling movement who want solid information on dealing with the public. Topics include: Getting Started, Looking Professional, Announcing Yourself, Being Interviewed (with tips for talking with the media, print interviews, broadcast interviews, and talk radio), Putting Your Message Out, and Events & Community. This book was originally published in 1996.
Thirteen Ways to Help Your Library Help Homeschoolers
Jeanne Faulconer
If you’re looking for a way to provide a service for homeschoolers in your community, consider becoming a liaison between your library and homeschoolers. Create activities and events for a homeschool audience. Help establish a homeschool resource center within the library. Coordinate with the library to have a Homeschool Day. Help the library find volunteers. Be an intermediary between the homeschool community and the library. And support your library's budget needs.
What is a Media Kit and How Do I Make One?
A media kit is a document you provide to potential advertisers and other parties you are interested in working with information about your value as a partner. It is meant to reflect your reach as a blogger. A media kit can be as simple as an ad page with basic blog and social media numbers or as complex as a full-blown demographic study of your readers printed and bound. Whatever kind of media kit you choose to create, remember to be clear and concise.


Looking for homeschooling information for another state?

Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Vermont
More States...


Our Top Picks
A Guide to Homeschooling for Librarians (Highsmith Press Handbook Series)
David C. Brostrom
 
The Librarian's Guide to Homeschooling Resources
Susan G. Scheps
 
 
 
Contact Us  |  Submit a Link  |  Privacy Statement

Copyright 2003-2014 HomeschoolinginAmerica.com